The Bionic Sound Project

this girl’s journey to sound

Hearing Aid Batteries and Cold Weather. Thursday, February 9, 2006

Filed under: hearing aids,pre-activation,pre-surgical,unhappy — Allison @ 1:35 pm

My hearing aids are making me insane.

I changed the batteries on tuesday afternoon (and they usually last for up to 2 weeks), and for the last few weeks, they’ve been dying within 2 days. It only seems to be a problem here in New York. I get these annoying click-click / beep-beep indicators (low-battery), or this really weird screeching noise repeatedly, whenever environmental sounds are made (and it depends on the battery). I’ve switched batteries within hearing aids, and then the hearing aid that gets the other battery gets the low battery indicator. Even replacing it with a new battery, sometimes the low-battery indicator comes back on.

It’s probably time to get them in and repaired/tuned up, but I can’t bear the thought of being without my hearing aids for any length of time. It’s also probably time to get new ones, but the cost of getting two is quite a drop in the bucket for me.

To my deaf buds, am I the only one who is having trouble with the cold weather and their hearing aid batteries?

To my hearing buds, if I don’t hear you as well lately, I apologize.

 

21 Responses to “Hearing Aid Batteries and Cold Weather.”

  1. Kelly Says:

    Nope, somehow the cold air seems to kill off my hearing aid batteries like whoa.

    I buy them in bulk, always, so I don’t really feel the strain on my wallet. But it’s a pain nonetheless!!

  2. Lauren Says:

    that is crappy, thought kind of surprising
    i have heard that to keep other kinds of batteries (like AA for example) to last longer, you should keep them in the fridge

  3. Kyle Says:

    I suppose that if extreme cold can kill my car battery, moderate cold can polish off hearing aid batteries…

  4. Makropulos Says:

    You’re not the only one – it’s been very cold in England recently as well, and I’ve been getting through batteries at something like 2-3 times the normal speed. Gah. Let’s have some sprintime soon🙂

  5. Peter Says:

    Batteries drain slower in cold temperatures. While this sounds like a good thing, it also means that the batteries cannot provide higher currents for as long.

    Yay chemistry!

  6. Sarah Says:

    Cold air does that to all batteries…

    I understand not being able to bear the thought of being without your hearing aids for any length of time…I miss mine like crazy…

  7. Katie Says:

    get these annoying click-click / beep-beep indicators (low-battery), or this really weird screeching noise repeatedly, whenever environmental sounds are made (and it depends on the battery).

    I know the feeling. When I worn my implant for the first time in 10 years, I went to school and I keep hearing the beep-beep sound. I kept asking Mitch if he heard that and we were wandering around LBJ building. I actually thought I was about to losing my mind. tsk.

  8. Matt Says:

    Electrical Engineering explation: electrons don’t move as well in cold air, so ALL batteries die quicker. I can go into the math, but no one here wants to see it. There is a reason why you are never suppose to keep your laptop in your car when it’s cold out (or any electronic for a matter of a fact). If it’s cold enough, some electronics can’t even power-up due to electrons not being able to flow at all.

  9. Matt Says:

    Not for another 6 weeks, arounding to that furry animal that pop’s out of the ground on Feb. 2nd.

  10. Matt Says:

    Lauren, it is true that when you are not using batteries, keeping them in the fridge helps keeping them alive, but if they are currently in use (current is flowing through them), then this only drains them much faster.

  11. Maegan Says:

    it’s cool, i’ll love you anyway even if i have to repeat myself 5 times.😀

  12. Kyle Says:

    Matt, I thought that it was thermal expansion and contraction risking destruction of circuits… but that is a good reason that I hadn’t thought of.

    Glad I don’t leave my laptop in my car.

  13. Matt Says:

    Maegan – Cute icon ;D

  14. Matt Says:

    Kyle, their related, but seperate technically.

  15. Kat Says:

    i’ve noticed that too with my hearing aid batteries.

  16. Markus

    It was quite useful reading, found some interesting details about this topic. Thanks.

  17. Chris Says:

    When is it bad weather why do people get insane???
    I have noticed , that anytime it rains, or there is a freeze, the public panics, rushes out to the stores and buy up all the
    bottled water, batteries, flash lights, firelogs, and canned food. Why is this. You would think people that have been through
    this kinda weather before would understand that it will not last more than a day or two at the most.
    Another thing I have noticed is when it rains that all the dumb people again get on the roads and cause wrecks and everything
    else.
    What is wrong with the people? I would really like to know.

  18. Gerry Says:

    Just wanted to add that in England I get my hearing aid and any batteries free. When you finally get good health insurance in the USA maybe you will enjoy not having to fork out for repairs and replacements either. In the meantime I too get anoying bleeping all the time too!

  19. Suzanne_pvh@frontier.com Says:

    You should never put hearing aid batteries in the fridge. Hearing aid batteries are zinc-air and are activated by contact with the air. This means that they are porous and can also absorb moisture. Placing hearing aid batteries in the fridge puts them in a moist environment, thereby causing drain. If there is alot of moisture in the air batteries will drain more quickly and your hearing aid may also react to the moisture. Be sure to use some type of overnight drying system to maintain your hearing aid.

    • Suzanne_pvh@frontier.com Says:

      ** I forgot to note that I work for a Dr. of Audiology and we often incude battery, moisture and weather issues in our newsletter.


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