The Bionic Sound Project

this girl’s journey to sound

July 16 and 19th…Harmony, Car Accidents, and Surgeries Monday, July 23, 2007

July 16th – two readers/their family members from this site had their surgeries! I hope they went well (I know one of them did!)

I finally got to order my harmony as well…but it’s going to take a 2-week turnaround to get it. At the rate Advanced Bionics is going with this, I won’t get it in the mail and activated till I return to school in September (which will make Mandy happy!)

July 19th – I hear a car accident for the first time with the cochlear implant. And from a block away. I was hanging out on the far side of the parking lot after work, talking to my boss as we usually do after every shift, when we hear this noise (which I didn’t know at first, but due to the expression on her face, I quickly figured it out). It sounded like a loud firecracker, due to the “boom!” that I heard. Pam says that the noise we first heard was probably the screech of the brakes, and then we looked up in time to hear the crash (she saw stuff flying through the air, I didn’t).

I was the first one to respond to the accident scene while Pam called 911 on her cell. It makes me sick that not one person who witnessed the accident stopped to help. The woman was bleeding, and her head hit the windshield, shattering it. To make the situation more interesting, the woman who hit her, left the scene and didn’t return till like 7 minutes later. I heard her car before I saw it, and was thinking “holy cow, somebody’s car really needs to go to the shop”. It was making clunking/chugging noises (half of the hood was smashed in).

I’ve never heard a car accident, not even with the hearing aid. I heard it distinctly with the cochlear implant, but my hearing aid did not pick it up at all. But Thursday was a really bad day overall (my friends/coworkers know why, and I thank everybody for their support and love).

Finally, I love meeting people with cochlear implants at work. It’s always fun to run into guests who have a cochlear implant, and then find out we have the same doctor. What I like more is hearing their stories about their implant experiences, especially if they’ve gone bilateral. 🙂

WE GET THE NEW WALKIES TOMORROW (TUESDAY) AT WORK! Must bring my various cables so I can plug it in directly into my cochlear implant and find out which one works the best…that’s going to be a fun experiment…I can’t wait! 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

I finally uploaded a video clip of me playing the piano – “The Gypsy Baron” by Johann Strauss. I’m still working on finding my other audio clips of my piano playing…or rerecording them as a video, but I’m out of practice, my piano needs to be tuned, and the humidity makes one of the major keys stick.

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Harmony Info and Hearing Things That Hearing People Don’t Notice Monday, December 4, 2006

Today was the first day of the quarter. I did errands and had a therapy session with Mandy. First I stopped to see Karen about scheduling speech therapy for this quarter, but to no avail. Mandy’s going to be playing speech therapist AND audiologist.

While working out my schedule in Karen’s office, she was typing away at the computer, eating a cracker, and I heard something which sounded like somebody hammering in the distance.

“Karen, do you hear that noise? It sounds like somebody hammering.”

“No, I don’t, I am eating crackers though. That may be what you’re hearing.”

“No, that’s not it, there definitely is a noise that sounds like faint hammering.”

So she stops everything she was doing, and listens for a few seconds.

“I still don’t hear anything.” and after she said that, she leaned down and picked up her bag that was pressing against the buttons of the tape recorder on the floor, making the “hammering” noises that I was hearing.

“There is absolutely NO way that you could have heard that.”

“Yeah, I did hear it. It sounds like ‘thnk-thnk-thnk-thnk’.”

“That is so incredible. It’s just unbelievable what you are hearing. I don’t even know how many decibels that was, but I couldn’t even hear it myself, and it took me a few seconds to figure out what it was! It’s a low, low, low frequency sound, almost silent, and to pick that up, wow!”

So, I went over to see Mandy since it was time for my appointment with her, and Karen told Mandy what happened with my sound discovery, so both of them looked pleased.

I’m going to be seeing Mandy 2x a week for auditory practice, and not seeing Karen for speech therapy, because of all the schedule problems from last quarter, and my final class schedule wasn’t definite until today, and everything’s booked. As a result, I’ve decided to fly solo this quarter without an interpreter for my major class. My teacher does know some sign, and has experience teaching all-deaf classes, and is willing to work with me in his class without an interpreter. It’s scary, but I’m up for the challenge. I just hope I don’t fail, because it is a 5-credit hour class out of 12 credits.

Mandy got back from the audiology conference that was in Buffalo this weekend, and true to her word, she showed me all the stuff she got at the conference, that had to do with the Harmony.

If I thought Megan and Dr. M were excited about the Harmony and what I am going to think of it, Mandy is way more excited about it than they are, and myself. She wants to get started with the Harmony…NOW. Hehe.

So far I’m the only active patient of hers that is going to be getting the Harmony (especially in January) and what I had to hear about the Harmony was pretty interesting.

Among some of the features of the Harmony:

– Built-in programmable LED light that will give system status for different things. It will be like the Firefly for the Auria, but most operations will be programmed to either light up for a short time, or permanently be on during operation.

– programming with the Harmony will be similar to programming with the Auria, but it will be one-click. It will convert the MAPs from HiRes 90 to HiRes 120 with a single click of the button. When I go in with the new Harmony, all it has to do is get my MAP from the Auria, and convert it with the click of the button.

– Users with the Platinum Sound Processor will be able to use the HiRes 120 processing strategy. This is a great way to determine if they like the strategy enough to upgrade and switch to the Harmony. With the Auria, there is no way to test out the HiRes 120 to see if you like it, except for getting the Harmony.

I’m really happy I got my cochlear implant in July, because I will automatically get to start with the Harmony and HiRes 120 processing immediately. I don’t have to wait several months to take advantage of the HiRes 120 Fidelity, as it will be much stronger and powerful than the Auria.

The patients who are getting implanted in January and beyond will not be able to take advantage of the Harmony’s benefits immediately. Apparently, the FDA is recommending that all new patients start off with the HiRes 90 processing/programming strategies (which is the Auria’s capabilities), then switch to the Harmony’s HiRes 120 capabilities 3 to 6 months after activation.

Now that I know what my Auria can do, and sound for the most part is normal, I’m ready to take on the Harmony and reach the next level with my hearing!

 

The Three-Month Checkup Friday, December 1, 2006

I had my three-month checkup today with Dr. M and saw Megan for a mapping session. It was at 1, but I thought it was at 11 instead and was there early. But it was 1 pm in NY time, so I get credit for that! But Dr. M was nice enough to see me anyway, and had me come back at 1 to see Megan.

Prognosis is that I’m doing great.

Megan changed the M and T levels, and gave me a program that will work in noisy situations. So now I have one for normal life, one for noise, and one for the iPOD.

I did show up with the kumquats, and she laughed. ^.^ Told ya I would bring you some, and I’m one who sticks to my words!

Got 42% on my listening test for speech in noise, which was better than what I got with the hearing aids, but could be better. (I’m a perfectionist). I had a hard time with the beep test, because I thought I was hearing a kind of prolonged high-frequency noise, so I wasn’t sure if I was hearing it or not.

The most interesting part of the visit was when I was talking to Dr. M about the vertigo episodes from October, where he said it could be a migraine. Not the typical migraine that people think of, as there are many types of migraines in different parts of the body, including the abdomen. So it could be a type of cranial migraine, I think that’s what he said.

Anyway, to avoid that, it involves watching my caffeine, chocolate, and yellow cheese(!!!) intake. Managing stress is also another key factor. But the cheese has to do with the dye in it, and all three come from a bean, and they haven’t figured out why it causes that. Caffeine isn’t an issue, as I’m not a coffee drinker and rarely consume soda. I do like chocolate, and cheese to a degree (rather picky though).

Heading back to school tomorrow for three weeks. I’m not ready for another quarter!

I hope the next quarter will rock academically, because I did extremely well with the Cochlear Implant, for my first quarter having it. I made the Dean’s List for the first time what feels like forever and got a 3.58 for the quarter. It was amazing, especially to get the A in that class I was struggling with in terms of access services. We’ll see what happens winter quarter, as I’m choosing to fly solo…

 

Susan, Webinars, And The Emergency Vet Thursday, November 30, 2006

Tuesday, I saw Susan for listening therapy. She was near the end of the “webinar” for the new Advanced Bionics Harmony processor, so she brought me back to her office so I could see what it was like. It was interesting watching and listening to the webinar, and seeing some images and testimonials for the Harmony. I love how AB is using technology to bring the information out to the masses.

Susan also mentioned an term called “auditory closers”, and that’s something I want to look into, because it has to do with a combination of the brain’s processing versus the actual listening of what is being said. That’s one reason why I can figure out what is being said, even though I may not have heard everything that was said in the sentence.

I had a bit of trouble with some sets of sentences, and not so much with others. It’s interesting how the same sentence, said in different ways, can make more sense as compared to repeating it. I like it when I get things correctly, but they like it when I’m challenged by it!

Wednesday, Susan was talking to Megan and I came up in the conversation, and it was discovered that there was an miscommunication in the scheduling, so I will be able to see her and Dr. M on Friday instead of waiting till January. Yippie.

Wednesday night, we had a freeze warning for our area, and my poor 14-year-old dog fell in our pool. She was already showing the symptoms of not feeling well, but after the pool incident, she definitely was very sick, so we took her to the emergency vet. She’s going to be okay, but she’s a very sick doggie. It was both interesting and sad being at the emergency vet, because it was a listening sound adventure for me.

I felt awful listening to the poor dog that kept howling and crying because it was in a lot of pain after it got attacked by two other dogs. The cochlear implant gave me the beginning and end of the howl, whereas the hearing aid just picked it up and ended it at mid-howl. I could hear the emotion in the howl, which really tugged at my heartstrings, because I wanted to help ease the pain for the poor dog. I could also hear the different howls, barks, and yips from the different dogs, and it turned into a game of figuring how how many dogs were speaking at once, and differentiating between the “voices”. It really wasn’t a game, but we were waiting for quite awhile, and I was interested in what I was hearing, as it was a new environment.

My mom commented that it was interesting that I was hearing all these sounds and bringing it to her attention, as she never really thinks about it, as it’s all white noise to her. However, it depends on what it is, and if it catches her attention or not. So we got into a discussion of how hearing people filter out the sounds, and it was interesting to hear about it.

I could also hear the employees talking, and was figuring out if it was a male or female voice, the chair scraping on the floor as it was pushed back, a drawer being closed, and I was identifying all these sounds from inside the examination room, and my mom was confirming what I was hearing for me. However, I did hear one person laugh, but couldn’t tell if it was male or female.

So yeah, it was an interesting night. I’m just glad my dog is going to be okay, and I hope that other dog survives as well as the other sick animals there.

 

The First Update On Sounds I’ve Heard While At Home Sunday, November 19, 2006

Here’s the brief update of the last 3 or so days that I have been home.

Flying was okay, no major problems there, but I really appreciate the separation and clarity of sound that the CI gives. However, my inner ear didn’t seem to like flying that much, as I felt a bit separated/off-balance when changing planes and when I arrived at home.

Mom says I seem to have a little bit of trouble understanding her or not hearing her as well as I did in the past. I’m not sure if it’s an adjustment period or what. But it too, shall pass.

She did say that my speech sounds so much better than it did before. As a matter of fact, when I answered the phone with my standard “hello, hold on please”, and handed the phone to my mom, it was my godmom on the other end of the phone. She asked my mom “who was that? I didn’t recognize who it was.” She said my speech was so clear, but she couldn’t understand what I was saying because I talked really fast. (Sorry, Karen! I know I’m supposed to slow down!)

Here’s what I’ve been hearing since I’ve been home.

11/17/06 – the cat (Benny) giving himself a bath. He’s noisy when he licks himself, making this kind of slurping/gulping sound. I can’t describe it. But I was like, holy cow, you’re that noisy when taking a bath? I could also hear him purr without being next to his head.

11/17/06 – hearing the music from the itty-bitty speakers attached to my iPOD playing in my room upstairs, while walking around downstairs.

11/18/06 – the very beginning of the quiet growl that Pippen makes before she goes into a full-blown hiss, and the details that make up her hiss/growl language. I also got bitten (more than once) while trying to cut the mats out of her fur, before she finally peed on me. *sigh*

11/18/06 – hearing Pippen hiss at the dog, before she smacks Elizabeth and tells her to mind her own business. I could hear it, but couldn’t see it.

11/18/06 – the “rhhhk-rhhhk” of the nail file as mom was filing her nails while we were watching a movie. It was driving me nuts! Haha.

11/19/06 – hearing the hydroplane boats at Firebird Lake in the distance (just barely, and only if it was absolutely silent). The lake is about 15-20 miles away from my house. It sounded like a very low “mmmmm”. However, while typing this as my mom’s on the phone, I just heard the bigger boat clearly. My eyes widened, and Mom looked over at me and said, “yep that was the boats.”

As for my guinea pig, he just came home from being boarded at the vet yesterday morning, and I haven’t really had time to see what he sounds like. He was really cute though, when I put him on the floor to run around. It was safe to do so, as the entire first floor is empty, and we are still doing work downstairs. Right now, he doesn’t want to get up and greet the day. He’s usually very vocal in the morning, but not today. We checked on him to make sure he was okay, and he ran out of his house, and as soon as we set it back down, he ran back into it and went back to sleep. I think he was worn out from running around downstairs.

I wasn’t able to get an appointment to see Dr. M and Megan for this break, and have to wait till January! But I will be able to see Susan, and I am excited about that!

I go back to work tomorrow and that’s going to bring a whole new plethora of sounds for me. Whee!

 

Going Home For The First Time Since August Wednesday, November 15, 2006

I am oh so VERY excited. Today I am going home for the first time since August 30th!

I’m actually at the airport right now, waiting to board my flight, and killing time by posting from my sidekick. Going through TSA was much easier this time, probably due to the high volume of deaf people that live and travel in this city.

Today, the weather couldn’t be any more perfect…51 degrees, bright blue skies, and sunny! I’m looking forward to the weather back home even more…79-82 degrees!

I finished the fall quarter with my last final this morning. This quarter was an interesting one for many reasons, but most importantly, I survived with a cochlear implant.

I’m so excited to go home because I cannot wait to hear what sounds there are back home. I want to know if I can hear the sounds of my dog, cats, and guinea pig. I know my guinea pig makes whistles, squeaks, wheeks, and a whole host of high-pitched noises, but I really can’t hear it unless he’s right next to my ear. Mom says that he calls when he’s hungry, wants attention, or hears the refrigerator open. And then I have my three cats, one which growls and hisses at everything (we don’t get along), the other likes to have “conversations” with you, and the third likes to quietly announce her presence when she jumps up on the bed, commanding your attention, otherwise she gets mad and jumps down. I want to hear toenails clicking on the tile, the clomp-clomp-thump of my three-legged cat as he walks around, the bells jingling on their collars, and the sound of my dog snoring, which always cracks up my mom.

I can’t wait to hear the sounds that my house makes. I want to hear the noises that happen in the neighborhood (especially the kids at the park, which the people on my street can hear).

It is going to be a mind-shock for me because I only got to experience being home for the first 2.5 weeks with the CI, and my brain didn’t understand what it was hearing. Now it’s almost 3.5 months later, and what is going to be different? Am I going to be catching on to what my mom says in conversation even better than I did with the hearing aid? I’m just bursting at the seams thinking about it.

I was talking to Kathy the other day at work about going home. She warned me that I need to be patient with my family, especially my mom. As a grandmother herself, she cannot imagine what it must be like for my mom, away from me while I’m experiencing all these new sounds. My mom has been there with me every step of the way, and she is very, very, very excited to see me and how I am doing with the CI.

Next week, I start up again at my old job (that I didn’t get to work at this summer, due to the complications after surgery), and I’m excited. It’s going to be stressful, with the holiday shopping, Black Friday, and cranky, stressed people. But it doesn’t bother me because I’m more interested in seeing how much the CI helps me in the work environment, working in customer service, and hearing the noises that make up a retail store. So here’s my new test!

Working on seeing Susan at least once or twice while I’m home and continuing with my listening therapy, plus seeing Dr. M for my 3 month checkup, and importing my current MAPs into Megan’s computer.

Ending on that note, that reminds me, I need to go buy a kumquat. 😀

 

First Visit to the Audiologists at school, and therapy session with Karen Thursday, September 7, 2006

Today I went over to the audiology/speech department at school for the first time since last May. My first therapy session, speech with Karen, was at 1 pm.

While waiting for Karen, I saw some of the audiologists that I knew, Don and Catherine, who I have worked with in the past. Both knew about my interest in the CI, as Catherine was interviewed by me for an assigned story for the school newspaper (which didn’t get published). This lead to my interest about going through the evaluation process, which she did several times, due to my chickening out. Don was the one who started the process of new digital hearing aids with me, until he was completely booked for the rest of the quarter, and I saw Mandy instead. There were some other staff that I didn’t know, but knew who I was, after Catherine mentioned that I was the writer of this blog. I felt strangely like a mini-celebrity.

After exchanging greetings, Catherine told me that she “just had to say this to me…Mango”. That lead me to do a fake walking out the door in protest.

The dirty little secret that everybody doesn’t know is that I had a mango smoothie for lunch today, and bought mango fruit the other day for a snack.

I was asked different questions from the audiologists about the CI, and Mandy appeared from her office in the middle of it, and I was excited to see her. I didn’t get to finish answering all the questions, as Karen came along, and it was time for my therapy.

Karen and Mandy have worked out a plan of therapy for me, in which I do speech (and listening if necessary) with her one time a week (due to schedule conflicts), and see Mandy 2x a week for listening therapy. It has been so long since I last saw Karen, either spring or fall 2003, so we had to do new testing for me.

We started off with going through the battery of speech tests: Fisher-Logemann, Rainbow passage, Clarke Sentences, and a 2.5 minute free speech recording. All of these tests were recorded into a computer, where they will be listened to by a professional familiar with deaf speech, and a person not familiar with deaf speech, and scored. Next week we will get started on actual therapy.

I talk extremely well, but my biggest challenge is that I talk too fast! I also tend to drop some sounds in speech, out of habit/laziness, and sometimes use “stop” signs in speech instead of flowing continuously.

Regarding the dizziness, I had another bout this morning, leading me to trip over a box that I have yet to unpack and lose part of my poor toenail in the process. At the suggestion of Mandy and Catherine, I called Dr. M’s office this afternoon to follow up. Dr. M said that the dizziness is sometimes brought on by a change in altitude, and should subside soon.